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The Secret Life of Crime Chocolate

October 9, 2017

Pure Nacional Cacao, the thought-be-extinct chocolate we saw in NMK Inc is, as most of you know, a real thing.  Though associated with Ecuador, the trees that it turned out were still with us were found in the Marañón River Canyon of Peru, and it’s Peru that cultivated new trees from that precious stock to produce Fortunato No 4. While this stuff is pricey, $20-40 a bar when I was researching NMK, it’s not absurdly, catastrophically expensive like, say, the $1000 sundae at Serendipity 3.

I mention this because CNBC has a video on it… sorta.

The 'crime chocolate' from Cat-Tales NMK Inc is a real thing

“The thing is—and I really hope you’ll see the funny here—the fact is, Bruce, these are sort of… crime chocolates.” – Selina Kyle, NMK Inc.

Ecuador seems to have got its hands on enough trees for a small crop, and we can assume they either paid more than they can ever recoup, or they assume being the original source of Nacional Cacao, they can hike up the price for the added cache.

Their chocolate, according to CNBC, goes for $345 a bite. (Note the lack of a decimal?) For “a little under 2 ounces” that comes to $6.16/a gram. In contrast, two bite-size “ingots” of Fortunato No 4 from Patricia’s Chocolate in Michigan goes for… $3.80. (See the decimal?) That comes out to $0.24 /gram.

So enjoy the vid, but be aware if tasting this stuff is on your bucket list, there’s a world full of chocolatiers listed on the Marañón website where ethically sourced Fortunato No 4 can be had for the price of a cheese slice at Grimaldi’s.

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